Featured Stories

Categories

What Germany is doing right

Graham Immerman
January 08, 2018

Almost a quarter of Germany's economy comes from manufacturing. They are behind only South Korea and China in their share of manufacturing in national economies. "After World War II, Germany put in place a financial and institutional structure that supported manufacturing, but the economy's emphasis on "making things" goes back much further to a tradition of very capable small and middle-size companies called the Mittelstand. In Germany, they are seen as the foundation of the country's manufacturing success." German manufacturing businesses put a focus on long term success and make quality products. Focusing on long term success in the U.S. includes machine monitoring and Industry 4.0! Learn from Germany's success and invest in your future with us!

How Germany Wins At Manufacturing — For NowSource: http://www.npr.org

This is the first of three reports from NPR's John Ydstie on Germany's manufacturing strength. The United States needs to create more manufacturing jobs: That has been a constant refrain of President Trump and was one of the goals of the corporate tax cut recently passed by Congress and signed into law. The loss of manufacturing jobs has been a problem for many countries, especially the U.S. It played a big role in Trump's election. Read More

Comments

Related posts

Professionals happy in business/manufacturing career
19Jun

Professionals happy in business/manufacturing career

Have you heard? The manufacturing field is a great place to work.  For example, those working in supply chain are reporting high job satisfaction.  IndustryWeek said, "When asked to rate their overall...

Job growth in manufacturing from automation
19Jun

Job growth in manufacturing from automation

The manufacturing industry showed a lot of job growth in May 2019! Advanced Manufacturing reported, "Manufacturing added 3,000 jobs in May, with transportation equipment leading the way. Durable goods...

NPR on robots and people
17Jun

NPR on robots and people

Robots are not here to eliminate the need for humans.  NPR reported, "In general, people and robots work best together, with robots handling dangerous, monotonous jobs and precision work, while people...

NPR on robots and people
05Jun

NPR on robots and people

Robots are not here to eliminate the need for humans.  NPR reported, "In general, people and robots work best together, with robots handling dangerous, monotonous jobs and precision work, while people...

Why some people don't like change
31May

Why some people don't like change

Change is an essential part of growing as an industry and finding continued success. However, some people just don't like it.  Industry Week said, "Although mitigating resistance may be a time-consumi...

What's next for additive manufacturing
22May

What's next for additive manufacturing

Additive manufacturing has gone through many transformations since it was invented, but there are a few more big changes before it goes mainstream.  IndustryWeek said, "Though the promise of additive ...

Where AI is heading
20May

Where AI is heading

Artificial intelligence is already used in manufacturing, but it could soon be used even more! Industry Week reported, "According to an IFS survey of 750 manufacturing companies across 16 countries, 8...

Impacts of the helium shortage
16May

Impacts of the helium shortage

The helium shortage has already affected Party City and they announced that they are closing 45 stores. How is the shortage affecting manufacturing? USA Today said, "Although there are long-term ramif...

Learning from Boeing's mistakes
08May

Learning from Boeing's mistakes

Paying attention to detail in production is important, as Boeing learned the hard way.  IndustryWeek said, "Boeing production employees have said that the leaders at these two plants put production ou...

Why does everyone hate meetings?
25Apr

Why does everyone hate meetings?

Why does everyone seem to hate meetings so much? They are vital for forward movement and growth in a business. Industry Week said, "Instead of creating a forum for productive conflict to be surfaced a...